From Hope to Horror: Diplomacy and the Making of the Rwanda Genocide
By Joyce Leader

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyber War and the Hunt for the Kremlin’s Most Dangerous Hackers
By Andy Greenberg

Sudden Courage: Youth in France Confront the Germans, 1940-1945
By Ronald C. Rosbottom

From Sadat to Saddam: The Decline of American Diplomacy in the Middle East
By David J. Dunford

Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World
By Samuel Moyn

The Buried: An Archaeology of the Egyptian Revolution
By Peter Hessler

Iran Reframed: Anxieties of Power in the Islamic Republic
By Narges Bajoghli

Fearing the Worst: How Korea Transformed the Cold War
By Samuel F. Wells, Jr.

 

 

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From Hope to Horror: Diplomacy and the Making of the Rwanda Genocide
By Joyce Leader

University of Nebraska Press, March 2020
ISBN: 978-1-64012-245-1
440 pages
As deputy to the U.S. ambassador in Rwanda, Joyce E. Leader witnessed the tumultuous prelude to genocide—a period of political wrangling, human rights abuses, and many levels of ominous, ever-escalating violence. From Hope to Horror offers her insider’s account of the nation’s efforts to move toward democracy and peace and analyzes the challenges of conducting diplomacy in settings prone to—or engaged in—armed conflict.

Leader traces the three-way struggle for control among Rwanda’s ethnic and regional factions. Each sought to shape democratization and peacemaking to its own advantage. The United States, hoping to encourage a peaceful transition, midwifed negotiations toward an accord. The result: a revolutionary blueprint for political and military power-sharing among Rwanda’s competing factions that met categorical rejection by the “losers” and a downward spiral into mass atrocities. Drawing on the Rwandan experience, Leader proposes ways diplomacy can more effectively avert the escalation of violence by identifying the unintended consequences of policies and emphasizing conflict prevention over crisis response.

Compelling and expert, From Hope to Horror fills in the forgotten history of the diplomats who tried but failed to prevent a human rights catastrophe.

REVIEWS:

“Ambassador Joyce E. Leader provides a rare, moving, and personal account of the path to genocide in Rwanda, arguing that U.S. and international diplomacy, which prioritized democracy promotion and peace over conflict prevention, inadvertently contributed to the crisis. From Hope to Horror offers practical lessons for policy makers derived from Rwanda’s tragedy.”—Susan E. Rice, former national security adviser and U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations

“Joyce Leader’s authoritative account of the years and months leading up to Rwanda’s orgy of killing in 1994 is destined to become a definitive history of what went wrong, why, and when. It belongs at the center of literature on this important episode in Africa’s modern history.”—Chester A. Crocker, James R. Schlesinger Professor of Strategic Studies at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

“A treasure trove of information and insights. Joyce Leader’s plan for diplomatic reform that would prioritize conflict prevention and resolution and her detailed organizational proposals deserve wide reading within the foreign policy and national security policy communities.”—Herman J. Cohen, former U.S. assistant secretary of state for African affairs and career ambassador

“Joyce Leader obliges us to . . . ask how so many well-intentioned diplomats could have inadvertently contributed to one of the most murderous episodes in modern history. Her book is a must-read for all who hope to honor the injunction ‘Never again!’”—George Moose, vice chair of the U.S. Institute of Peace and former assistant secretary of state for African Affairs

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Joyce E. Leader is a retired U.S. Foreign Service officer who served as the deputy chief of mission in Rwanda and as a U.S. observer to the Rwandan peace talks in Arusha, Tanzania. She culminated her State Department career as ambassador to the Republic of Guinea in West Africa.

 

 

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyber War and the Hunt for the Kremlin’s Most Dangerous Hackers

By Andy Greenberg

Doubleday, November 2019
ASIN: B07GD4MFW2
348 pages
In 2014, the world witnessed the start of a mysterious series of cyberattacks. Targeting American utility companies, NATO, and electric grids in Eastern Europe, the strikes grew ever more brazen. They culminated in the summer of 2017, when the malware known as NotPetya was unleashed, penetrating, disrupting, and paralyzing some of the world’s largest businesses—from drug manufacturers to software developers to shipping companies. At the attack’s epicenter in Ukraine, ATMs froze. The railway and postal systems shut down. Hospitals went dark. NotPetya spread around the world, inflicting an unprecedented ten billion dollars in damage—the largest, most destructive cyberattack the world had ever seen.

The hackers behind these attacks are quickly gaining a reputation as the most dangerous team of cyberwarriors in history: a group known as Sandworm. Working in the service of Russia’s military intelligence agency, they represent a persistent, highly skilled force, one whose talents are matched by their willingness to launch broad, unrestrained attacks on the most critical infrastructure of their adversaries. They target government and private sector, military and civilians alike.

A chilling, globe-spanning detective story, Sandworm considers the danger this force poses to our national security and stability. As the Kremlin’s role in foreign government manipulation comes into greater focus, Sandworm exposes the realities not just of Russia’s global digital offensive, but of an era where warfare ceases to be waged on the battlefield. It reveals how the lines between digital and physical conflict, between wartime and peacetime, have begun to blur—with world-shaking implications.

REVIEWS:

Sandworm is a sobering examination of an underreported story: The menace Russian hackers pose to the critical infrastructure of the West. With the nuance of a reporter and the pace of a thriller writer, Andy Greenberg gives us a glimpse of the cyberwars of the future while at the same time placing his story in the long arc of Russian and Ukrainian history.”- Anne Applebaum, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Gulag and Red Famine

“A beautifully written deep-dive into a group of Russian hackers blamed for the most disruptive cyberattack in history, NotPetya, This incredibly detailed investigative book leaves no stone unturned, unravelling the work of a highly secretive group that caused billions of dollars of damage.” – TechCrunch

“A terrifying and infuriating look at a future in which cyberwar hawks and cyberwar deniers join forces to literally threaten our ability to continue civilization. Sandworm shows how, in our leaders’ focus on maintaining digital weapons to attack our enemies, they’ve left our own critical infrastructure defenseless.” – Cory Doctorow, New York Times bestselling author of Little Brother and Radicalized

“An in-depth investigation of what the Russian military’s best cyber unit has already done to disrupt corporations, penetrate utilities, and prepare for cyberwar.  Sandworm is a sword of Damocles over the US economy that any US president has to take into account when deciding on whether and how to counter the Kremlin.” – Richard Clarke, former White House counterterrorism coordinator, author of The Fifth Domain and Cyber War

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Andy Greenberg is an award-winning senior writer for Wired magazine, where he covers security, privacy, information freedom, and hacker culture. He is the author of the 2012 book This Machine Kills Secrets, and his stories for Wired on Ukraine’s cyberwar (including an excerpt from Sandworm) have won a Gerald Loeb Award for International Reporting and two Deadline Club Awards from the New York Society of Professional Journalists.

 

 

Sudden Courage: Youth in France Confront the Germans, 1940-1945
By Ronald C. Rosbottom

Custom House, August 2019
ISBN-10: 0062470027ISBN
ISBN-13: 978-00624700
336 pages
The author of the acclaimed When Paris Went Dark returns to World War II once again to tell the incredible story of the youngest members of the French Resistance—many only teenagers—who waged a hidden war against the Nazi occupiers and their collaborators in Paris and across France.

On June 14, 1940, German tanks rolled into Paris. Eight days later, France accepted a humiliating defeat and foreign occupation.  Most citizens adapted and many even allied themselves with the new fascist leadership. Yet others refused to capitulate; in answer to the ruthless violence, shortages, and curfews imposed by the Nazis, a resistance arose. Among this shadow army were Jews, immigrants, communists, workers, writers, police officers, shop owners, including many young people in their teens and twenties.

Ronald Rosbottom tells the riveting story of how those brave and untested youth went from learning about literature to learning the art of sabotage, from figuring out how to solve an equation to how to stealthily avoid patrols, from passing notes to stealing secrets—and even learning how to kill. The standard challenges of adolescence were amplified and distorted.

Sudden Courage brilliantly evokes this dark and uncertain period, from the beginning of the occupation until the last German left French soil. A chronicle of youthful sacrifice and courage in the face of evil, it is a story that holds relevance for our own time, when democratic nations are once again under threat from rising nativism and authoritarianism. Beyond that, it is a riveting investigation about what it means for a young person to come of age under unpredictable and violent circumstances.

REVIEWS:

“Following up on…When Paris Went Dark, Ronald Rosbottom now recounts movingly the inspiring story of young people who resisted the Nazi occupation. With far-right forces rising again in Europe and the United States one can only hope that such sudden courage will not be needed again.” – William Taubman, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Khrushchev: The Man and His Era, and of Gorbachev: His Life and Times

“Ron Rosbottom brings his demonstrated mastery of the German occupation of France, plus decades as a college professor, to vividly revise our understanding of the French resistance, and how dependent it was upon the energy and moral courage of very young women and men.” – Joseph J. Ellis, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of American Dialogue: The Founders and Us

“Active resistance to the Nazi occupation of France in 1940 to1944 often depended on young people. The adolescents among them brought special assets to dangerous actions and faced stresses particular to their age. . . .A thoughtful and stirring book.” Robert O. Paxton, professor emeritus of history, Columbia University, and author of Vichy France: Old Guard and New Order

“An exceptional account about the French Resistance… Highly recommended for Francophiles and those interested in World War II.” – Library Journal (starred review))

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Ronald C. Rosbottom is the Winifred L. Arms Professor in the Arts and Humanities and a professor of French, European Studies, and Architectural Studies at Amherst College. Previously he was Dean of the Faculty at Amherst; he is a Chevalier de l’Académie des Palmes Académiques. His previous book, When Paris Went Dark: The City of Light Under German Occupation, 1940-1944, was longlisted for the National Book Award for Nonfiction. He divides his time between Amherst, Massachusetts, and Paris.

 

 

From Sadat to Saddam: The Decline of American Diplomacy in the Middle East
By David J. Dunford

University of Nebraska Press, Potomac Books, December 2019
ISBN-10: 1640121579
ISBN-13: 978-1-64012-157-7280
280 pages

From Sadat to Saddam offers a fresh perspective on the politicization of the U.S. diplomatic corps and the militarization of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. This book begins with the 1981 assassination of Egyptian president Anwar Sadat, continues through two Gulf wars, and ends with the U.S. withdrawal of combat troops from Iraq in 2011.

This firsthand account of thirty years in the diplomatic trenches of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East addresses the basic questions of how and why we find ourselves today in endless military conflict and argues that it is directly related to the decline in reliance on our diplomatic skills.

From Sadat to Saddam offers an in-depth look by a career diplomat at how U.S. soft power has been allowed to atrophy. It chronicles three decades of dealing not just with foreign policy challenges and opportunities but also with the frustrations of working with bureaucrats and politicians who don’t understand the world and are unwilling to listen to those who do. The book makes clear that the decline of our diplomatic capability began well before the election of Donald Trump. It recommends that instead of trying to make soldiers into diplomats and diplomats into soldiers, we invest in a truly professional diplomatic service.

REVIEWS:

“Ambassador Dunford has written a very important book that is much more than just a memoir. It vividly describes the challenges faced by those on the frontlines of diplomacy and how Washington can often make those challenges even more daunting by incoherent or inattentive policy. A must-read for anyone who wants to know how the real world of diplomacy works, or fails to.”- Ambassador Dennis Jett (Ret.), professor of international affairs at Pennsylvania State University

“Ambassador Dunford has written an important and timely book that shows why U.S. diplomacy still matters in an era of reduced budgets and insufficient understanding of just what diplomats do. His long and varied career in the Foreign Service is a testament to how the State Department can successfully contribute to making the United States and the world more secure—but only with proper resources and leadership. Dunford’s book, full of personal insights, deserves a wide readership.”- J. Kael Weston, author of The Mirror Test: America at War in Iraq and Afghanistan

“[David Dunford’s] down-to-earth narrative describes his engagement with issues large (the U.S. response to the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait) and small (day care for embassy families in Riyadh). . . . This is an exquisite portrait of what our diplomats are capable of and how their role has deteriorated, especially after the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq.”- Daniel Serwer, academic director of conflict management at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

David J. Dunford served three years as the U.S. ambassador to Oman and served four years, including during the 1990–91 Gulf War, as the deputy ambassador to Saudi Arabia. He is a member of the governing board of the University of Arizona’s Center for Middle East Studies. He has taught courses on the Arab-Israeli conflict and the Middle East business environment at the University of Arizona and has consulted for both the government and the private sector on Middle East issues. He is the coauthor of Talking to Strangers: The Struggle to Rebuild Iraq’s Foreign Ministry. He divides his time between Tucson and Durango.

 

 

Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World
By Samuel Moyn

Belnap Press, Harvard University Press, September 2019
ISBN-10: 0674241398
ISBN-13: 978-0674241398
296 pages

The age of human rights has been kindest to the rich. While state violations of political rights have garnered unprecedented attention in recent decades, a commitment to material equality has quietly disappeared. In its place, economic liberalization has emerged as the dominant force. In this provocative book, Samuel Moyn considers how and why we chose to make human rights our highest ideals while simultaneously neglecting the demands of broader social and economic justice.

REVIEWS:

“No one has written with more penetrating skepticism about the history of human rights than Samuel Moyn…In Not Enough, Moyn asks whether human-rights theorists and advocates, in the quest to make the world better for all, have actually helped to make things worse – Adam Kirsch, Wall Street Journal

“No one has done more than Samuel Moyn to unsettle the story of human rights as a triumphal march of upgrades from Magna Carta to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights…Not Enough asks us to rethink what human rights might accomplish if they were deployed not simply to set limits on state power, but to harness that power for the purpose of fostering economic equality.”- Benjamin Nathans, New York Review of Books

“… Not Enough explains how―across the fields of development, moral advocacy, philosophy, and governmental policy―the ideal of sufficiency gradually supplanted what was once an ideal of equality for all… The apparent paradox exposed in Not Enough is what makes the book another tour de force: what are we to make of the fact that our age of human rights was coterminous with the age of neoliberalism? …Moyn implores us to consider: what is the value content of justice in our age of human rights, and how do we try to rectify inequality, if the social and economic rights enumerated in international human rights law put no ceiling on wealth creation?”- Patrick William Kelly, Los Angeles Review of Books

“Samuel Moyn breaks new ground in examining the relationship between human rights and economic fairness. If we don’t address the growing global phenomenon of economic inequality, the human rights movement as we know it cannot survive or flourish.”- George Soros

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Samuel Moyn is Professor of Law and Professor of History at Yale University. His interests range widely over international law, human rights, the laws of war, and legal thought in both historical and contemporary perspective. He has published several books and writes in venues such as Boston Review, Chronicle of Higher Education, Dissent, The Nation, New Republic, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal.

 

 

The Buried: An Archaeology of the Egyptian Revolution
By Peter Hessler

Penguin Press, May 2019
ISBN-10: 0525559566
ISBN-13: 978-0525559566
463 pages

Drawn by a fascination with Egypt’s rich history and culture, Peter Hessler moved with his wife and twin daughters to Cairo in 2011. He wanted to learn Arabic, explore Cairo’s neighborhoods, and visit the legendary archaeological digs of Upper Egypt. After his years of covering China for The New Yorker, friends warned him Egypt would be a much quieter place. But not long before he arrived, the Egyptian Arab Spring had begun, and now the country was in chaos.

In the midst of the revolution, Hessler often traveled to digs at Amarna and Abydos, where locals live beside the tombs of kings and courtiers, a landscape that they call simply al-Madfuna: “the Buried.” He and his wife set out to master Arabic, striking up a friendship with their instructor, a cynical political sophisticate. They also befriended Peter’s translator, a gay man struggling to find happiness in Egypt’s homophobic culture. A different kind of friendship was formed with the neighborhood garbage collector, an illiterate but highly perceptive man named Sayyid, whose access to the trash of Cairo would be its own kind of archaeological excavation. Hessler also met a family of Chinese small-business owners in the lingerie trade; their view of the country proved a bracing counterpoint to the West’s conventional wisdom.

Through the lives of these and other ordinary people in a time of tragedy and heartache, and through connections between contemporary Egypt and its ancient past, Hessler creates an astonishing portrait of a country and its people. What emerges is a book of uncompromising intelligence and humanity–the story of a land in which a weak state has collapsed but its underlying society remains in many ways painfully the same.

REVIEWS:

“Nuanced and deeply intelligent—a view of Egyptian politics that sometimes seems to look at everything but and that opens onto an endlessly complex place and people.” – Kirkus, starred review/One of Kirkus Reviews’ Best Books of 2019

“Original, richly layered, and often delightful reporting. Hessler has a sharp sense of humor, a gift for observation, a healthy skepticism, and a knack for using memorable characters and anecdotes to demonstrate larger truths . . . This is what reporting can be at its best: clear-eyed and empathetic, an addition to the historical record.” – New York Review of Books

“Egypt’s tragedy has now found a non-fiction writer equal to the task in Peter Hessler . . . What separates him from most other foreign correspondents is a strange alchemy in his writing and storytelling that gives him an ability to spin golden prose from everyday lived experience. . . . [The Buried] is filled with insight both about the cyclical nature of Egyptian politics and what is eternal and unchanging in this most ancient of countries, whose civilization goes back an astonishing, unbroken 7,000 years. The result is a small triumph, one of the best books yet written about the Arab spring.” – The Guardian

. . . . Drawing both from daily life and from interviews with highly placed political figures, the book is an extraordinary work of reportage . . . Sensitive and perceptive, Mr. Hessler is a superb literary archaeologist, one who handles what he sees with a bit of wonder that he gets to watch the history of this grand city unfold, one day at a time.” – Wall Street Journal

The Buried is the kind of book that you don’t want to end and won’t forget. With the eye of a great storyteller Peter Hessler weaves together history, reporting, memoir, and above all the lives of ordinary people in a beautiful and haunting portrait of Egypt and its Revolution.” – Ben Rhodes, author of The World As It is: A Memoir if the Obama White House

The Buried is wonderfully impressive, not a conventional travel book at all, but the chronicle of a family’s residence in Egypt, in a time of revolution—years of turmoil in this maddening place. And yet Peter Hessler remains unflustered as he learns the language, makes friends, puts up with annoyances (rats, water shortages, mendacity) and delves into the politics of the present and the ancient complexities. It is in all senses archeology—tenacious, revelatory, and humane.” – Paul Theroux

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Peter Hessler is a staff writer at the New Yorker, where he served as Beijing correspondent from 2000-2007 and Cairo correspondent from 2011-2016. He is also a contributing writer for National Geographic. He is the author of River Town, which won the Kiriyama Book Prize, Oracle Bones, which was a finalist for the National Book Award, Country Driving, and Strange Stones. He won the 2008 National Magazine Award for excellence in reporting, and he was named a MacArthur fellow in 2011.

 

 

Iran Reframed: Anxieties of Power in the Islamic Republic
By Narges Bajoghli

Stanford University Press, September 2019
ISBN-10: 1503610292
ISBN-13: 978-1503610293
176 pages

An inside look at what it means to be pro-regime in Iran, and the debates around the future of the Islamic Republic.

More than half of Iran’s citizens were not alive at the time of the 1979 Revolution. Now entering its fifth decade in power, the Iranian regime faces the paradox of any successful revolution: how to transmit the commitments of its political project to the next generation. New media ventures supported by the Islamic Republic attempt to win the hearts and minds of younger Iranians. Yet members of this new generation—whether dissidents or fundamentalists—are increasingly skeptical of these efforts. Iran Reframed offers unprecedented access to those who wield power in Iran as they debate and define the future of the Republic. Over ten years, Narges Bajoghli met with men in Iran’s Revolutionary Guard, Ansar Hezbollah, and Basij paramilitary organizations to investigate how their media producers developed strategies to court Iranian youth. Readers come to know these men—what the regime means to them and their anxieties about the future of their revolutionary project. Contestation over how to define the regime underlies all their efforts to communicate with the public. This book offers a multilayered story about what it means to be pro-regime in the Islamic Republic, challenging everything we think we know about Iran and revolution.

REVIEWS:

Iran Reframed offers marvelously original insight into one of the world’s most misunderstood countries. Narges Bajoghli reflects on the success and failure of revolutions, the meaning of ideology, youth and aging, and the ways politics seeks to address deep human longings.” – Stephen Kinzer author of All the Shah’s Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror

Iran Reframed is incomparable. A must-read on Iran’s media landscape and paramount for anyone who wants to understand Iran as it really is. Gripping and provocative.” – Negar Mottahedeh author of Whisper Tapes: Kate Millett in Iran

“In this beautifully written and extraordinarily rich book, Narges Bajoghli demonstrates a deep anxiety within the Iranian regime about how to transmit the ideology of the Revolution forty years on. With Iran Reframed, we come to understand the contradictions and frustrations behind the regime’s justifications of its past, present, and imagined future.” – Sherine F. Hamdy author of Our Bodies Belong to God: Organ Transplants, Islam, and the Struggle for Human Dignity in Egypt

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Narges Bajoghli is Assistant Professor of Middle East Studies at the School of
Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University. She has written for
the New York Times Magazine, the Guardian, and the Washington Post, and has
appeared as a commentator on NPR, PBS, and the BBC. She is the director of
the documentary The Skin That Burns, screened at The Hague, Hiroshima,
Jaipur, and film festivals throughout the United States.

 

 

Fearing the Worst: How Korea Transformed the Cold War
By Samuel F. Wells, Jr.

Columbia University Press, November 2019
ISBN-10: 0231192746
ISBN-13: 978-0231192743
600 pages
After World War II, the escalating tensions of the Cold War shaped the international system. Fearing the Worst explains how the Korean War fundamentally changed postwar competition between the United States and the Soviet Union into a militarized confrontation that would last decades.

Samuel F. Wells Jr. examines how military and political events interacted to escalate the conflict. Decisions made by the Truman administration in the first six months of the Korean War drove both superpowers to intensify their defense buildup. American leaders feared the worst-case scenario―that Stalin was prepared to start World War III―and raced to build up strategic arms, resulting in a struggle they did not seek or intend. Their decisions stemmed from incomplete interpretations of Soviet and Chinese goals, especially the belief that China was a Kremlin puppet. Yet Stalin, Mao, and Kim Il-sung all had their own agendas, about which the United States lacked reliable intelligence.

Drawing on newly available documents and memoirs―including previously restricted archives in Russia, China, and North Korea―Wells analyzes the key decision points that changed the course of the war. He also provides vivid profiles of the central actors as well as important but lesser known figures. Bringing together studies of military policy and diplomacy with the roles of technology, intelligence, and domestic politics in each of the principal nations, Fearing the Worst offers a new account of the Korean War and its lasting legacy.

REVIEWS:

A masterful study of one of America’s most consequential and most forgotten wars. Samuel F. Wells Jr. weaves together astonishing stories of nuclear strategy and cut-throat bureaucracy in this must-read for anyone eager to understand how the Korean War changed the Cold War―and made the world what it is today. Graham Allison, Harvard University

This excellent book offers new insights into how the Korean War laid the basis for today’s military competition with Russia, China, and North Korea. Wells analyzes how decisions taken during the Korean conflict dramatically expanded NATO into the central institution that protected the West through the four decades of the Cold War. – Alexander R. Vershbow, former U.S. Ambassador to Russia and South Korea and Deputy Secretary General of NATO

Wells tells the seldom understood story of how revolutionary the impact of Korea was on the nature and scale of the four-decade Cold War, and he does so with a masterful and definitive combination of detail, insight, new sources from both sides, and page-turning readability. – Richard K. Betts, author of American Force: Dangers, Delusions, and Dilemmas in National Security

Wells has drawn on a massive body of documentation and secondary literature from both sides in the Cold War to produce an impressive synthesis of its evolution through the Korean War. Fast paced and persuasively argued, Fearing the Worst should attract an audience well beyond academe. – William Stueck, author of Rethinking the Korean War: A New Diplomatic History

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Samuel F. Wells Jr. is a Cold War Fellow in the History and Public Policy Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, where he founded the International Security Studies Program and served as associate director and deputy director. His publications include The Strategic Triangle: France, Germany, and the United States in the Shaping of the New Europe (2006).

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