A Line in the Sand

April 2012

Review by David Beechey
A Line in the Sand: The Anglo-French Struggle for the Middle East 1914-1918, By James Barr, W. W. Norton & Company: N.Y., ISBN 978-0-398-07065, 2012, 464 pp.

Somewhere in France, Somewhere in Germany

January 2012

Review by James Abrahamson
Somewhere in France, Somewhere in Germany: A Combat Soldier’s Journey through the Second World War. By Francis P. Sempa. (Lanham, MD: Hamilton Books, 2011. Pp. x, 102.

Gaddafi Had His Chance

November 2011

by Robert Earle In early May my friend Blakely said that he had been contacted by a third party representing Moammar Gaddafi’s most influential son, Saif al-Islam. Saif al-Islam wanted to convey a message to Washington through unofficial channels, and … Continued

Alliance Politics in Asia

September 2011

Reviewed by James W. White
Thomas J. Christensen, Worse Than A Monolith: Alliance Politics and Problems of Coercive Diplomacy in Asia. Princeton: Princeton University Press, ISBN 978-0-691-14260-9, hard cover, (ISBN 978-0-691-14261-6 paperback), 2011, 306 pp.

Countering Iranian Malign Influence

April 2009

The Need for a Regional Response by William Wunderle and Gabriel Lajeunesse While global attention has been focused mostly on Iran’s developing nuclear capability, the Iranian regime has also been very active in extending its malign influence throughout the Middle … Continued

Northeast Asia Regionalism and Linkages with Southeast Asia

June 2008

Along with the six-party negotiations on North Korea’s nuclear arms, talks have been quietly proceeding on broader political, economic, and security issues in Northeast Asia and a future regional “architecture” that would foster peaceful, constructive relationships into which North Korea … Continued

George Bush’s Unfinished Asian Agenda

June 2005

The author bases this informative survey on a presentation he made in April to a university study group on Asia. As the reader will note, he finds the record mixed, with successes in dealing with China and Japan, and a … Continued